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Annual Report 2009

MESSAGE FROM THE CHAIR

Integrated Development Foundation (IDF), from the very beginning, has been working with the hilly but poor people of the Chittagong Hill Tract districts and focused its activities primarily on microfinance. The purpose is to bring about an improvement in the overall socio-economic conditions of these disadvantaged people. It was initially a difficult task working with almost un-covered and un-served population living in such remote and difficult areas. IDF feels proud for successfully overcoming all challenges and difficulties and go ahead with its declared vision and mission.

Over the years, along with microfinance, IDF pursued the policy of integrated approach of rural development and encompassed the areas of other aspects like health, education, agriculture, renewable energy, housing, human rights/democracy & governance, disaster management and so on. IDF, along with gradual expansion of program activities, also expanded its area of operation and started serving now the rural poor of seven districts in Bangladesh. IDF is considered as one of the largest MFIs in the south-eastern part of the country in terms of both membership and geographical coverage.
   
The performance of the dedicated staff, supports of all donors, assistance by executive & general bodies and cooperation of the well wishers of IDF have significantly contributed towards this achievement.

It is heartening to note that the present status of the details of these activities with the growth trends in the past years have been reflected in the IDF Annual Report 2007. I congratulate those who had done the hard work of preparing the report. I do believe that the readers will get an insight of IDF activities through this report. However, any suggestions from the readers will enable us to enrich the quality of the report in future.


A. K. Fazlul Bari
Chairperson, IDF




NOTE FROM THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

In 2009, IDF completed 16 years. 2009 was the year of re-organization and re-setting the methodologies and policies to recover from the shocks due to global financial crisis and high food prices that affected our members severely. The top management visited branch to branch, discussed with grassroots staff to understand causes of crisis and their solutions and to encourage them to implement make up plan by heart. The Board reviewed salaries and benefits of the staff in 2009 and recommended to increase it in 2010 if the organization makes surplus. All these helped to reduce delinquency and improve the quality of portfolio in 2009.


The growth curve moved upwards in 2009. The total increase in membership, Loan portfolio and members savings in 2009 were respectively 5789 (8.0% increase on 2008), Tk.38.06 million (9.20% increase on 2008) and Tk.17.06 million (8% increase on 2008). The repayment rate increased from 99.00% in 2008 to 99.16% in 2009. The portfolio quality and repayment rate improved in 2009 due to hard work of all IDF staff as expected last year.

IDF handled and survived the global financial crisis and turmoil due to price hike effectively in 2009. This was possible because of commitment and hard work of all IDF staff members and sincere cooperation from our development partners and local social leaders of our working areas particularly in Chittagong Hill Tracts. We are very grateful to Grameen Trust, Sida, Helen Keller International, PKSF, Grameen Foundation USA, Deutsche Bank, CowBank (Australia), Basic Bank, Sonali Bank, BRAC Bank, Government of Bangladesh, IDCOL, CHT Regional Council, NGO Affairs Bureau, NGO Foundation, CHT District Councils, Deputy Commissioners, Upazila Nirbahi Officers and law Enforcing Bodies for their supports and cooperation. We are grateful to BWTP (South Asian Microfinance Forum) for extending its membership to IDF in 2009.

We are also grateful to our Board Members for their active support in handling the crisis and implementing various programs in 2009. I cordially thank our founder and life members for their active and positive role and guiding us to take appropriate policies and measures in mitigating the crisis.

We hope continuous support from our friends, partners and well wishers to our endeavors of fighting against poverty.

Zahirul Alam
Executive Director, IDF



Microcredit Summit Champaign's Goal

• 175 million of the worlds poorest families, especially the women of those families, are receiving credit for    self-employment and other financial and business services by the end of 2015; and

• 100 million of the Worlds poorest families move from below US$ 1.00 a day adjusted for purchasing power    parity (PPP) to above US$ 1.00 a day adjusted for PPP, by the end of 2015.

INTRODUCTION


Integrated Development Foundation (IDF) is a non-profit, non-political and a non-government organization established in December 1992 by Mr. Zahirul Alam, a former ILO staff member and founder member-secretary of the Rural Economics Program of the Department of Economics at the University of Chittagong from where Grameen Bank Microfinance Model was developed by Nobel Laureate Prof. Professor Muhammad Yunus in the 1970s.

IDF started its journey through micro-finance program in a small para (sub-village) of Shoalok Union in Bandarban Hill District in 1993 with a seed capital loan of US$ 7,500.00 from Grameen Trust. The people found IDF’s micro loans very useful within one year. As a result, demand of IDF’s small credit grew very fast in the area which was not possible to meet with small seed capital received from Grameen Trust. For meeting this demand, IDF approached various donors for support as advised by Prof. Muhammad Yunus. Swedish International Development Co-operation Agency (Sida) responded immediately and supported IDF for experiment and expansion of Grameen Microfinance Model in the whole of Chittagong Hill Tracts in the framework of a long-term (8 years) sustainable plan. IDF implemented the project successfully, which subsequently attracted other donors and partners including Bangladesh Government, PKSF, ILO, Helen Keller International (HKI), UNICEF, CARE Bangladesh, AusAID, IDCOL, Grameen Foundation USA, Deutsche Bank, CowBank (Australia), Basic Bank, Sonali Bank and Bangladesh Krishi Bank and others.

VISION

Create poverty free Bangladesh.

MISSION

Combating poverty in the impassable hilly regions and other un-served areas of Bangladesh for creating a poverty free Bangladesh.

OBJECTIVE

The main objective of IDF is to assist the poor, the landless, the destitute women and children, small farmers and disabled persons in order to enable them to gain access to resources and undertake various income-generating and other activities for poverty alleviation and to enhance their quality of life in terms of health, nutrition, sanitation, education, safe water, housing and the environment through building effective institutions of their own, which they can understand and operate and can find socio-economic strength in it through mutual support.

GOVERNANCE

The supreme authority of IDF is General Body. It is composed of 18 members from different professions. A Governing Body consisting of 7 members is elected from amongst the General Body of the Foundation. The General Body is the highest policy and decision making body members of IDF. The Governing Body is responsible for the formulation of plan and budget for the programs and projects to be implemented by the organization. The Governing Body evaluates and monitors the implementation of policies, programmes and projects through various monitoring tools and visits to the project areas. A Chairman elected by the General Body heads both General and Governing Body. The Executive Director works as Member-Secretary of both the Bodies.

The Executive Director is the Chief Executive of the Foundation and responsible for the smooth implementation of all activities of the Foundation. He implements the activities through the appointed professionals and support staff of the Foundation.

THE OPERATIONAL AREA

The present operational area of IDF is Chittagong Hill Tracts, Chittagong, Cox’s Bazar, Dhaka and Rajshahi. A brief description of the operational area is presented below.

Chittagong Hill Tracts

The Chittagong Hill Tracts (CHT) is a beautiful and strange piece of land with rocks, hills, lakes and sea. These are very difficult and remote areas, inhabited by about thirteen very poor tribes with different languages and cultures. The area is wedged between the Bay of Bengal and the hills of Mizoram of India.


The CHT is a 13,295 sq. km. region of hills consisting of Bandarban, Rangamati and Khagrachari districts located in the south-east of Bangladesh. As per the preliminary result of the Population Census 2001, the total population of CHT is 1.325 million; of which 52 percent are tribal people. Historically, Chittagong Hill Tracts enjoyed the status of a self-governing territory and administered by Hill King which continued until the British East India Company annexed Bengal in 1787. The Chakma Raja (King) then signed an agreement after a long armed conflict, under which Chakma territory became a British tributary on the payment of 20 tons of cotton. This was later extended to other parts of CHT. In 1860, the British formally annexed CHT and upgraded its status to a full-fledged district.

The people of Chittagong Hill Tracts are very poor and they live mainly on Jhum cultivation and bamboo and wood collection from forests, which are major causes of deforestation and soil erosion in the area. Most people of this area live in absolute poverty. Despite of all the efforts of the government, the people of the Chittagong Hill Tracts still lack access to various services such as credit, agricultural inputs and extension services, medical facilities, sanitation and safe drinking water. This is mainly because of i) scattered population, ii) poor communication system, iii) remoteness of the area and iv) political problem. The language barrier further aggravates the situation.

The sentiment of the people of CHT was hurt when the construction of 666 meters long and 43 meters high hydroelectric dam at Kaptai started in 1957. The immediate impact of dam was the submergence of a vast area of natural forests and 54,000 acres of arable land (40% of total cultivable lands in CHT) of the area. It also made about 1,800 families homeless. The displaced people were not properly rehabilitated. As a result, their settlement and construction of new houses in the inaccessible regions led to rampant deforestation. It is also said that some families crossed the border and migrated.

Adverse economic impacts created by Kaptai Dam on displaced people gradually resulted in armed insurgency in CHT. The counter-insurgency measures by the then Pakistan Government through military action worsened the situation. The increased military presence in CHT and search for insurgents created unsettled situation among CHT inhabitants. It was a very tense situation when IDF started its micro-finance program in CHT in 1993.

Chittagong

Chittagong district is quite different from other districts in its unique natural beauty characterized by hills, rivers, sea, forests, and valleys. The greater Chittagong district was established in 1666 including the present Chittagong, Cox’s Bazar and the three hill districts. The district of Chittagong Hill Tracts was established in 1,860 with the hill regions of the district. Later, Chittagong district was further divided into Chittagong and Cox’s Bazar districts. The district consists of one City Corporation, 7 municipalities, 20 upazilas, 197 union parishads and 1,319 villages.


Cox’s Bazar

The area of Cox’s Bazar district is 2,491.86 sq. km. It is bounded by Chittagong district on the north, Bay of Bengal on the south, Bandarban district, Arakan (Myanmar) and the Naf River on the east, and the Bay of Bengal on the west. Cox’s Bazar thana was established in 1854. Cox’s Bazar subdivision was formed comprising of Cox’s Bazar Sadar, Chakoria, Maheshkhali, and Teknaf thanas. Afterwards, three new thanas (Ukhia, Kutubdia, and Ramu) were created under this subdivision. In 1984, the thanas were transformed into upazilas and Cox’s Bazar subdivision was elevated to a district under the decentralization scheme. It consists of 7 upazilas, 2 municipalities, 60 union parishads, 199 mouzas and 966 villages.

Rajshahi

The area of Rajshahi district is 2,407 sq. km. It is bounded by Naogaon district on the north; West Bengal of India, Kushtia district and the Ganges on the south; Natore district on the east and the Nawabgonj district on the west. Rajshahi district was established in 1772. It has one City Corporation with 4 thanas, 7 municipalities, 93 wards, 297 mahallas, 9 upazilas, 70 union parishads, 1,678 mouzas and 1,858 villages. Rajshahi town stands on the bank of the river Padma. It is both district and divisional town.

Dhaka

Bangladesh consists of 6 Divisions such as Dhaka, Chittagong, Khulna, Rajshahi, Barisal and Sylhet. Each Division has got some Districts. There are 64 districts in Bangladesh and Dhaka is one of those districts under Dhaka Division. It is also the capital city of Bangladesh. It stands on the bank of the Buriganga River. Dhaka District is geographically located almost at the centre of the country. Dhaka is surrounded by Narayanganj in the east, Gazipur in the north, Munshiganj and Faridpur in the south and Manikganj District in the west. It lies between 23053' and 24006' north latitudes and 90001' and 90037' east longitudes.

The total are of this district is 1463.60 Sq. Km. (565.10 Sq. miles) of which 45.92 Sq. Km is riverine. The Deputy Commissioner is the Chief Executive and he is also the Collector, Treasurer, and the District Magistrate of the District. DC coordinates the activities of the government and non-government offices in the district.

Dhaka District or Dhaka Zila is the oldest district of the country. There are different views about the origin of the zila name. There are various opinions about the naming of the Dhaka Zila or Dhaka District. One opinion was that the name Dhaka was derived from the word Dhakka (meaning watch station) which was required to be set to the water-ways near the present city of Dhaka.Dhaka district consists of several Thanas under Dhaka municipal area as well as five (5) upazilas. Dhaka City has seven (7) principal thanas and fourteen (14) auxiliary thanas under its jurisdictio

Comilla

Comilla is a city in south-eastern Bangladesh, located along the Dhaka-Chittagong Highway.Comilla is located at 23°27'0?N, 91°12'0?E, and has a total area of 280 square kilometers. It is bounded by Burchiganj and Tripura on the north, Laksham and Chauddagram on the south, and Barura on the west. The major rivers that pass through Comilla include Gumti and Little Feni. District, Comilla District Area.Total, 11.47km2(4.4 sqmi). Population(2007).-Total,419623.Density, 36584/km2(94752.1/sqmi).

Chandpur


Chandpur is a district in east-central Bangladesh. It is located at the mouth of the Meghna River. It is a part of the Chittagong Division. The town of Chandpur is terminus of a metre gauge branch of Bangladesh Railways.

Chandpur district has a total area of 1704.06 square kilometers. It is bounded by Munshiganj District and Comilla District on the north, Noakhali District, Lakshmipur District and Barisal District on the south, Comilla District on the east, and Meghna River, Shariatpur District and Munshiganj District on the west.

Chandpur is the confluence of two of the mightiest rivers of Bangladesh.. the Padma River (the main branch of the Ganges River) and the Meghna River, which meet near Chandpur Town. Important tributaries of the Meghna River flowing through Chandpur are Dakatia River, Dhanagoda River, Matlab River and Udhamdi River.

Noakhali

Noakhali is a district in South-eastern Bangladesh.Noakhali District is located in the Chittagong Division of Bangladesh. It has a land area of 3600.99 km², and is bounded by the Comilla district in the north, the Meghna estuary and the Bay of Bengal in the south, Feni and Chittagong districts in the east, Lakshmipur and the Bhola districts in the west.

The district's annual average temperature ranges from a maximum of 34.3 °C to a minimum of 14.4 °C; it's annual rainfall is 3302 mm. Its main rivers are the Bamni and Meghna.The Main problem of the Water Sector in Noakhali area is the acute drainage problem since mid seventies. This is due to the reclaimed land with very mild solpe. Flat terrain hinders the drainge. Situation become complicated by the hapazard road construction by LGED, R&H department and also encroachment of natural creeks and khals by people. The only drainage route i.e. Noakhali khal has no longer been a sufficient means for draining out huge catchment rainfall runoff. That why the entire Noakhali Distrcit has now been suffering with drainage congestion.

Noakhali district, whose earlier name was Bhulua, was established in 1821. It consists of 9 upazilas, 5 municipalities, 45 wards, 90 mahallas, 83 union parishads, 909 mouzas and 978 villages.


THE ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE

The programs and projects are implemented at a number of levels including head office, area office, branch, centre and group. The head office and coordination offices provide guidance, and supervise and monitor the activities of branch offices. The branch offices work directly with the poor people in their area, organizing them with a view to building a receiving mechanism and implementing various socio-economic programs for them. The institutional structure of IDF is shown in Figure-1.
 
THE PROGRAMS

2008 is the 15th year of IDF operations in poverty alleviation and social development. This annual report presents the overall progress of IDF activities in 2008. It also presents year-wise summery report up to December 2008. The major programs implemented in 2008 are:

8.1 Micro finance
8.2 Health, Water and Sanitation
8.3 Emergency Fund (Micro Insurance)
8.4 Eye Care
8.5 Vitamin-A capsule: CHT Project
8.6 Child Labour & Non Formal Education
8.7 Agriculture & Livestock
8.8 Improved Cook Stove
8.9 Renewable Energy (Solar Home System)
8.10 Skill Development
8.11 Housing
8.12 Human Rights, Democracy & Governance
8.13 Birth and Marriage Registration
8.14 Scholarship Program
8.15 Automation
8.16 Disaster Management
8.17 Environment
8.18 Gender Promotion

8.1 Microfinance

IDF launched its micro-finance program in a small para (sub-village) of Shoalok mouza of Bandarban Hill district for the poor, landless and underprivileged people in 1993.

IDF completed 16 years of operation of its microfinance program in 2009. Many of IDF clients who started as ultra poor gradually graduated to micro-entrepreneurs which are a great achievement of its microfinance programme. IDF’s clients broadly can now be classified into four categories. These are:


• Beggar
• Ultra Poor
• Poor
• Micro-enterprise

The different categories of members by their number, portfolio and savings as of December 2009 are shown in the Table 1:

Table 1: Members by category, loan portfolio and savings
Categories of Clients
No. of Member
Loan Outstanding (m Tk.)
Savings (m Tk.)
2009
Cum.
2009
Cum.
2009
Cum.
Beggars
79
809
0.05
.633
0.068
0.151
Poor & Ultra Poor
5398
75293
37.496
422.239
19.301
220.18
Macro-enterprise
312
2588
0.514
29.86
-2.311
9.229
Total
5789
78690
38.06
452.736
17.058
229.560

8.1.1 BEGGAR PROGRAM


IDF started its beggar program with the financial and technical assistance of Grameen Trust in May 2006. The objective and status of the program are described below.

Objectives:

• to build confidence and capacity of beggar;
• to enable them to gain access to resources and provide credit to undertake various income generating    activities;
• to make the beggar into productive manpower;
• to improve their overall socio-economic status.

Conditions

• Interest free
• flexible repayment schedule
• flexible loan period
• attendance in the meeting is not mandatory

Status as on 31 December 2009

Particulars
Up to 2008
In 2009
Up to 2009
No. of Branch
34
1
35
No. Member
730
79
809
Disbursed (m)
1.049
0.588
1.637
Outstanding (m)
0.583m
0.05
0.633
Repayment Rate
100%
100%
100%
Savings (m)
0.083m
0.068
0.151

8.1.2 POOR AND ULTRA POOR PROGRAM


IDF started this program in a small para (sub-village) of Bandarban Hill District with the assistance Grameen Trust in 1993. The objectives and present status of the program are presented below.

Objectives:

• To build confidence and capacity of the poor and ultra poor;
• To organize and built a receiving mechanism of the poor and ultra poor through which they can receive    their necessary services, inputs and financial assistance for the improvement of their socio-economic    status.
• To alleviate poverty from the very grass-root level of the country.

Status as on 31 December 2009


Particulars
Up to 2008
In 2009
Up to 2009
No. of Branch
53
3
56
No. Member
69,895
5,398
75,293
Loan disbursed (m)
3566.000
365.336
3931.336
Loan outstanding (m)
384.743m
37.496
422.239
Repayment Rate
99.14 %
99%
99.16%
Savings
200.879
19.301
220.180
Loan ceiling for

Ultra poor : Up to Tk.8,000
Poor : Tk 8,001 - 30,000

Ultra Poor with PKSF Assistance

The program covered 1,291 ultra poor families of 18 branches with seed capital from PKSF since November 2005. The particulars of the operation of PKSF funded ultra poor as of 31 December 2009 are presented below:

• No. of member : 3987
• Loan disbursed : 22.74m
• Loan outstanding : 1.35m
• Rate of repayment : 99.93 %
• Amount of savings : 2.84m

8.1.3 MICRO-ENTERPRISE


IDF started this product for its graduate members who developed capacity to invest and manage bigger scale of income-generating activity (micro-enterprise) in 2002-03. The criteria of electing a member for this product are as follows;

Criteria of micro-entrepreneur

• Graduate members who developed capacity to undertake enterprise;
• Received Enterprise Development and Business Management (EDBM) Training;
• 90% attendance in the weekly/ fortnightly meeting;
• 100% utilization of previous loan;
• Good track record of business;
• At least 10% of the proposed loan are accumulated in her savings account;
• Willing to participate at least 10% of the investment in the enterprise;
• Cooperation and involvement of family members in the enterprise;
• Regular deposit in savings account;
• Willingness to attend monthly cluster (20 members) meeting

Loan terms

• Working Capital : 01 year
• Fixed Capital : 02 years

Loan repayment conditions


• 1 month grace period
• Weekly installment
• Fortnightly installment
• Monthly installment

Risk Insurance

• Premium: 0.95% of the disbursed amount
• Risk coverage: 50% of the disbursed loan in case of the damage of the activity due to disaster.

Table 4: Status of micro-enterprise as on 31 December 2009
Particulars
Up to 2008
In 2009
Up to 2009
No. of Branch
49
-
49
No. of Member
2276
692
2968
Loan Disbursed (m)
154.620
186.336
340.956
Loan outstanding (m)
29.350
0.514
29.864
Rate of Payment
99.94%
98.99%
99.00%
Amount of Savings (m)
11.540
-2.311
8.189

8.1.4 Savings and Credit by size, number and amount

i) Savings

The total no. of retained savers and amount of savings on 31 December are respectively 78,690 and Tk. 229,559,571.00. The no. of savers and their savings are shown by size in Table 3.

Table 5: Distribution of savers as of 31 December 2009 by size and amount.

Saving Size (in Tk.)
Number
Amount
Up to 2000
25741
46233263
2001- 5000
26165
63336279
5001- 10000
14755
63192094
20001- 20000
9169
41760908
Above 20001
2860
15037027
Total
78690
229559571


ii) Credit

The total no. of retained borrowers and amount of loan portfolio on 31 December are respectively 69130 and Tk. 452,736,400. The no. of borrowers and their portfolio are shown by size, number and amount in Table 4.

Table 6: Distribution of loan disbursed in 2009 by size, number and amount.


Loan Size (in Tk)
Number
Amount
Up to 4000
9726
27666317
Up to 4001-10000
36544
156630255
Up to 10001-30000
21234
208655252
Up to 30001-50000
1307
30775239
Up to 50001-100000
260
17378222
Up to 100001-300000
13
10505748
Above 300001
46
1125367
Total
69130
452736400

Growth of Member and Savings

Table 6 below shows the growth trend of members and savings during 2005-2009. It also shows trend of geographical expansion of IDF for 5years.

Table 7: Growth Trend- Member, Area and Savings

Sl. No.
Component
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
01.
Member (by year)
7,722
9,765
5,412
4,708
5,789
02.
Member (cum.)
53,016
62,781
68,193
72,901
78,690
03.
Group (cum.)
11,874
13,842
15,957
17,413
18,921
04.
Centre (cum.)
2,273
2,668
3,016
3293
3572
05.
Branch (cum.)
43
49
51
53
56
06.
Union (cum.)
130
135
142
146
307
07.
Upazila (cum.)
34
34
36
38
80
08.
District (cum.)
6
7
7
7
7
09.
Savings (by year)*
26.16
40.08
27.67
20.60
17.06
10.
Savings (cum.)*
124.15
164.23
191.90
212.50
229.56
11.
Average Savings (cum.)
2,342
2,792
2,814
2,914
2,917

Note: 1. cum. = Cumulative. * = Figure in million Taka               

        Chart 1: Growth of members and borrowers by year     Chart 2: Growth of savings by year

Table-8: Growth Trend- Loan operations


Sl. No.
Component
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
01.
No of Loans (by year)
56,329
64,423
70,973
75093
78690
02.
No of Loans (cum.)
282,737
347,160
418,133
493226
571916
03.
Borrower (cum.)
49,854
58,445
63,176
65603
69130
04.
Loan disbursed (by year)*
433.02
561.79
763.89
755.55
853.13
05.
Loan disbursed (cum.)*
1,620.44
2,202.23
2966.12
3721.67
4574.80
06.
Loan due (by year)*
385.26
485.85
694.73
680.45
769.56
07.
Loan due (cum.)*
1,388.99
1,874.84
2569.57
3340.88
4110.44
08.
Loan realized (by year)*
384.77
486.27
678.44
702.85
819.85
09.
Loan realized (cum)*
1,388.50
1,874.77
2553.21
3256.06
4075.91
10.
Outstanding increase (by yr.)*
48.24
95.52
85.44
01.77
38.06
11.
Loan outstanding (cum.)*
231.94
327.46
412.90
414.67
452.73
12.
Loan overdue*
0.81
0.44
16.36
84.82
34.53
13.
Portfolio at risk >30 days*
4.85
4.41
20.78
32.00
33.60
14.
Average Loan size
7,687
6,343
7748
8771
6588
15.
Average outstanding (cum.)
4,653
5,837
6535
6313
6549
16.
Rate of repayment (by year)
99.96%
99.98%
99.92%
99.00%
99.16%
17.
Rate of repayment (cum.)
99.96%
99.98%
99.92%
99.00%
99.16%

Note: 1. cum. = Cumulative. * = Figure in million Taka   
                    
          Chart 3: Growth of loan disbursement by year   Chart 4: Growth of loan outstanding by year

Table – 9: Growth Trend- Financial
Component
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
A. CAPITAL FUND
01. Capital Fund / Equity
73.00
93.04
113.78
115.95
132.52
B. INTEREST RATES
02. Rate of Service Charge
12%
12.5%
12.5%
12.5%
12.5%
03. Inflation rate
6%
6%
6%
6%
6%
C. INCOME
04. Service Charge income from clients
53.83
64.73
91.49
94.68
93.33
05. Other income
2.10
1.52
1.73
3.91
6.35
06. Total income
55.93
66.25
93.22
98.59
99.68
D. NON-FINANCIAL EXPENSES
07. General Operating Expenses (Salaries, rents, utilities, cost of fund etc.)
35.11
44.11
54.48
66.55
74.91
08. Depreciation on fixed assets
0.97
0.13
1.15
1.22
1.82
09. Loan loss provision expense
2.12
2.10
3.70
29.03
3.56
10. Total Non Financial Expenses
38.20
46.44
59.33
88.80
84.297
E. ADJUSTED FINANCIAL EXPENSES
11. Adjusted Financial Expenses
     (Line-1 multiplied by line-3)
3.65
5.58
6.82
6.95
7.95
12. Total Expenses
     (Line-10 plus line-11)
41.85
52.02
66.15
95.75
92.24
13. Operational Self Sufficiency (OSS)
    (Line-6 divided by line-10)
146%
142%
157%
111.02
118.25
14. Financial Self Sufficiency (FSS)
    (Line-6 divided by line-12)
131%
127%
140%
102.96%
108%


8.1.5 Purpose of Loan


Table-5. Loan by Purposes (2004-2009)


Sl. No.
Component
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
01.
Farming
14.41
15.21
9.64
12.75
25.66%
02.
Cow rearing
10.05
7.92
9.80
9.56
5.42%
03.
Goat rearing
1.00
1.08
1.95
2.12
3.32%
04.
Beef fattening
8.26
7.55
7.03
6.68
5.79%
05.
Pig rearing
1.22
1.46
1.48
1.52
2.92%
06.
Poultry
4.31
3.67
5.12
3.98
4.36%
07.
Home Gardening
0.91
1.09
1.35
1.40
0.39%
08.
Fruit gardening
2.05
1.15
1.49
1.38
1.60%
09.
Nursery
1.11
1.02
1.47
1.65
0.64%
10.
Handicrafts
3.98
3.14
3.36
3.61
0.80%
11.
Garments/tailoring
3.19
2.47
3.51
3.44
2.57%
12.
Fisheries
3.65
3.75
9.43
6.74
5.71%
13.
Housing
0.61
1.66
1.23
2.10
2.1%
14.
Water Sanitation
0.82
.80
1.77
1.23
0.13%
15.
Local transport
9.40
7.66
9.28
9.79
7.36%
16.
Small Business
29.21
37.36
27.60
27.67
16.12%
17.
Micro Enterprise
5.82
3.00
4.50
4.36
15.11%
Total (%)
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00

8.2 HEALTH, SANITATION AND WATER


IDF started this program with the assistance of Sida in Chittagong Hill Tracts in 1995. The reasons for initiating this program were two. They are: i) ignorance of people on causes of various common diseases and ii) lack of access of poor people to health services and safe water. IDF launched a survey on the sanitation and water in selected villages of Bandarban Sadar in 1996 with the assistance of UNICEF which shows that about 95% households had no sanitary latrine and almost all rural households did not have access to safe water at that time.

IDF selects health agent/secretary from amongst the members in each centre. One health agent/secretary can look after more than one para (sub-village). Health agents are the motivators and contact persons at para levels. Health agents are provided training on causes of common diseases, primary health care, reproductive and child health, safe water and sanitation, HIV/AIDS and eye care. The organizational structure of IDF health program is shown below.


Objectives

• To make the poor people aware of health problems and the causes of common diseases.
• To ensure access of the poor people to health services, safe water and sanitation.
• To make the people conscious about the safe motherhood and child health.

Present Status

No. of Health centre : 4
Satellite Clinic : 3
Drop in Centre center : 5
Health Spot : 20

Clinical services

• General Patient : 9588
• STD Patient : 380
• Eye Patient : 987


Awareness Activities in 2009

Awareness raising on common diseases, safe motherhood, water sanitation:

01.
No. of participants in Health Education Session
: 4715
02.
Staffs/ Health agents training
: 3
03.
No. of participants in staffs/ Health agents Training
: 30
04.
Beneficiaries Training
: 3
05.
No. of participants in Beneficiaries Training
: 55
06.
Courtyard Meeting
: 8
07.
No. of participants in Courtyard Meeting
: 154

Awareness raising on STD/HIV/AIDS :

01.
Health Education Session
: 27,851
02.
First Contact
: 16,854
03.
Staffs/ Health agents training
: 2
04.
Participant on staffs/Health agents training
: 40
05.
Basic Peer training
: 12
06.
Participant on Basic Peer training
: 310
07.
Refresher Peer training
: 7
08.
Participant on Refresher Peer training
: 214


8.3 EMERGENCY FUND (MICRO INSURANCE)

IDF launched this component in October 1997 in response to the request of group members to help their families in case of serious sickness or death of any income earners of their families. The objectives and detail operational procedures and progress are presented below.

Objectives:

• To provide financial assistance to the members in case of serious sickness or death of any income earners    of their families.
• To help members in case of any natural calamity or disaster.


Formation of Fund

The fund is created by:


• Premium of group members. The premium is charged on the basis of loan size.

Conditions and amount of grants.

Particulars
For member
Family member
Death
loanee
Tk.1000+ Outstanding loan amount, maximum of Tk.10,000
Adult Tk.1,500
Children Tk500
Health
1st & 2nd loanee
Up to Tk.1,000
Up to Tk. 1,000
3rd loanee & above
Up to Tk. 1,500
Up to Tk. 1,500
Grants Distributed (in Taka)
Particulars                            2009
Cumulative
Grants for Treatment
No. of Person
2,455
14,393
Amount
1,702,600
10,460,600
Grants for Death
No. of Person
630
4,587
Amount
2,298,100
10,266,500
Total
No. of Person
3,085
18,980
Amount 4,000,700
20,727,100

8.4. EYE CARE

Eye problem is very common in Bangladesh. The people of Chittagong Hill Tracts are more vulnerable in eye health. IDF initiated this component through eye camps in collaboration with Lions Club of Chittagong Southern in Bandarban in 2002. The costs of surgery for referral cases were shared jointly by IDF and Lions Club. The component was undertaken as project by IDF in 2004 with the assistance of Helen Keller International (HKI). IDF has been implementing eye care as its regular programme since 2006.

Objectives

• To raise awareness on eye care and blindness among the common poor people of the remote areas of CHT, Chittagong and Cox’s Bazaar district;
• To provide primary diagnosis, treatment and referral support;
• To provide medical services at nominal cost to the poor;
• To prevent eye diseases from maiden period and provide services at the grass-root level.


The services provided in 2009 are shown below.

Progress-2009

Operation
: 36
Treated
: 733
Refractive Error treatment
: 218
Health Education session
: 8,352
Staffs /Health agents training
: 4
Participant on Staffs /Health agents training
: 60
Beneficiaries training
: 24
Participant on Beneficiaries training
: 580

8.5. Vitamin-A Capsule: CHT Project

IDF has been implementing this project in partnership with HKI in order to improve Vitamin A capsule distribution coverage in the hard to reach areas of Chittagong Hill tracts since September 2007. This project will continue up to June 2010. IDF supported HKI to conduct a baseline survey in the project areas on the basis of sample at the beginning of the project.

Objectives of the Program:

• Make NID program success in the hard to reach areas of CHT;
• Identify and minimize the gaps of VAC distribution in routine EPI.
• To build a strong relationship with District Civil Surgeon Office, Upazilla Health & Family Planning Office   and EPI staff in Thana Health Complex.


Project Areas

Khagrachari District
= All Upazila (8 upazila)
Bandarban District
= 1 upazila (Roangchari)
Rangamati District
= 1 upazila (Kawkhali)
Total children
= 22,864
Total family
= 29,757
Total volunteer
= 251


The hard to reach areas in CHT covered by the project are presented below:


District- Khagrachari

Upazila
Union
No. of Child (0-5 year)
No. of Population
EPI Center
1.Khagrachari Sadar
5
1,097
1,597
12
2. Mohalchari
4
707
950
16
3.Dighinala
5
4,759
5,362
30
4. Panchari
4
1,584
2,814
25
5. Matiranga
6
3,131
2,878
30
6. Ramgarh
3
2,952
3,233
28
7. Manikchari
2
4,035
6,395
19
8. Lakhkhichari
1
1,421
1,316
24

District- Rangamati

Upazila
Union
No. of Child (0-5 year)
No. of Population
EPI Center
9.Kawkhali
4
2,517
3,018
44

District- Bandarban

Upazila
Union
No. of Child (0-5 year)
No. of Population
EPI Center
10.Roangchari
4
661
2,194
23


8.6 CHILD LABOUR AND NON-FORMAL EDUCATION


IDF has been implementing this component since 1994. The main objectives of this program are:

Objectives:

Raise awareness on child rights and education;
• Provide basic education (read, write and count) to poor children who dropped-out;
• Reduce illiteracy rate;
• Provide micro-credit support to the parents of poor children;


Supply of Educational material in 2009

Books
- 630 sets
Note book
- 1,260
Sharpener
- 1,260
Rubber
- 1,260
Pencil
- 1,260
Colour Pencil
- 630 sets
Vitamin A - 630 pcs
Primary health check - 2 times per year
Conducting examination - 3 times per year

Designation
No.of Staff
Male
Female
Total
Project Coordinator
1
-
1
Project Supervisor
1
-
1
NFE Teacher
2
19
21

8.7 Agriculture & Livestock

8.7.1 Agriculture

• Established Integrated Farm at Matiranga in 15 acres of land where various types of 1700 seedlings and    or cuttings were planted in 2009.
• Constructed one demonstration shed for beef fattening.
• Prepare one demonstration plot for vegetable production.
• Prepare one demonstration plot for Turmeric Cultivation.
• Establish 1 Central Nursery, 1 Office Nursery, 110 Village Model Farms, 3820 homestead Gardens.
• Conduct 36 Kendro Workshop on Homestead Gardening covering 1200 beneficiaries.
• Distributed hybrid Maize seeds to farmers in Lama upazila.
• Distributed 950 kg of various types of seeds (vegetables, fruits, woods, ornamental etc.) to the farmers.
• 100,000 saplings produced in central and office Nursery in 2009.

8.7.2 Livestock

Progress in 2009


• Total disbursement Tk38, 790,500 to 3428 members;
• Conducted 17 training on Beef Fattening covering 600 members;
• Provided vaccines to 5,777 cattle, 407 goats and 6,390 poultry birds;
• Provided treatment to 1973 cattle, 932 goats, and 941 poultry birds
• Distributed 950 de-worming tablets for cattle.



8.8 Improved Cook Stoves Programme

IDF undertook this program in May 2008 with the assistance of German Technical Cooperation (GTZ). The main objectives of this program are:

• Decrease the use of fuel wood and save environment;
• Reduce fuel crisis and health hazards in families using traditional stoves;
• Improve cooking efficiency and mitigate health hazards.

The progress of this program is given below.

Sl. No.
District
2009
As 0f Dec. 2009
01.
Bandarban
68
127
02.
Rangamati
105
136
03.
Khagrachari
38
84
04.
Chittagong
443
600
05.
Cox's Bazar
31
92
06.
Dhaka
10
10
Total
695
1049

8.9 Renewable Energy

IDF started this program in collaboration with Infrastructure Development Company Limited (IDCOL), a government owned company in 2003. The main purpose of this program was to provide electricity through small scale solar home system to the rural and remote people who do not have access to national grid. People will have access to medium and long-term credit facility through this program to procure these systems. The program have plan to set up mini solar plants in future.

Progress

Particulars
2009
Cumulative
System Inst.
1,838
4,505
Loan disbursed
76,889,718
96,026,141
Loan repaid
16,525,729
45,171,079
Loan outstanding
22,097,034
50,855,062